Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Panchavan Madevi Pallippadai Temple, Ramanathan Koil, Pazhayarai

Panchavan Madevi Pallippadai Temple, Ramanathan Koil, Pazhayarai
Panchavan Madevi Iswaram or Panchavan Madevi Pallippadai Temple is a unique temple built in memory of one of the greatest Chola Emperor Rajendra Chola I’s Step Mother Panchavan Madevi. This temple shows Rajendra Chola’s unconditional affection and love towards his step mother. 

It is located at Ramanathan Koil near Pazhayarai. This temple is forerunner to Taj Mahal. Several hundred years before the Taj Mahal was built, a Tamil king had thought of such an idea and built a similar structure in memory of his stepmother. But now it is a monument of neglect.

The Temple is located very near to Patteeswaram. Patteeswaram is well connected to nearby Kumbakonam, Thanjavur & Darasuram. The hamlet of Pazhayarai near Kumbakonam was once the capital of the ancient Chola dynasty. The hamlets of Patteeswaram, Thirusakthimutram, Darasuram and Ramanathan Koil once formed the single great Pazhayarai.

Before Vijayalaya Chola could set up his capital in Thanjavur (850 B.C.) and lay the foundation for the powerful Chola Empire that followed, the Chola kings were the chieftains in Pazhayarai. It was in this metropolis that Raja Rajan (985 – 1014) spent his childhood and where his sister Kundavai lived with her husband. King Rajendran I (1012 – 1044) lived here before shifting his capital to Gangai Konda Chola Puram. A remnant of its past is a temple of art in Ramanatha Koil, built by Rajendran I.

Many types of temples exist in Tamil Nadu. One kind is known as the Pallippadai temple. `Pallipaduthuthal'' in Tamil means ``burying the dead'' and the temples that are built over the burial (``pallipaduthiya'') site are known as Pallippadai temples. These temples were built by Parantakan I for his father Aditya, and Raja Rajan I for his grandfather Arinjaya (Arnjijikai Iswaram). But the only edifice built as a Pallippadai koil where a queen (Panchavan Maha Devi) was buried is the temple in Ramanathan Koil, a forerunner to the Taj Mahal.

Raja Rajan the great's second queen was Vanavan Maha Devi, who bore him Rajendran I. Like his illustrious father, he was to rank among the noblest rulers of India. This king built or renovated 25 temples during his life-time, including the Siva temple he constructed in Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka, in honour of his mother, and named Vanavan Mahadevi Iswaram.

Rajendran seems to have been attached to his stepmother, Panchavan Maha Devi, the third queen of Raja Rajan. This lady was a daughter of Avani Kantharpa Purathu Devan, a chieftain of the Pazhuvettarayar clan that ruled Pazhuvur. From several temple inscriptions it is observed that this queen had been a very generous patron of various temples, and her gifts of a variety of icons in gold and other metals exhibit her dedication to religion.

It is assumed she had treated Rajendran like a son. On her demise, the monarch planned unique memorial, and he built a ``Pallippadai Koil'', as a house of art, and called it the Panchavan Maha Devi Iswaram. This temple of great love is in a state of decay.

When the kings of yore built a temple they ensured it had sufficient funds in the form of land gifts. In this temple, too, Rajendran had granted liberal endowments. In the basement of the central shrine of Panchavan Maha Devi Iswaram are several inscriptions engraved in characteristic calligraphy of the Chola era, enumerating the details of his gifts to this Temple. 

An inscription of the seventh year of Rajendran calls this hamlet as Pazhayarai, the Mudikonda Chola Puram in Narayur Nadu of Sathyasigamani Valanadu, and names the temple as Panchavan Madevi Iswaram, a pallippadai koil and the lord of the temple as Panchavan Madevi Iswarathu Maha Devar.

In the phrase that reads ``pallippadai Panchavan Madevi Iswarathu Mahadevar'', a vandal has tried to deface the word Pallippadai that is of much historical importance. Fortunately, the words carved on stone are still legible. This same inscription lists five Oduvar, a pidaran, a Siva Brahmin, an accountant, a treasurer, six drummers and a watchman as employees of the temple; defines their duties and details their remuneration.

The inscription records the provision made for three offerings a day to the Lord of the temple and one for each of the other three deities. Details of the constituents of the meals such as curry- rice, curd-rice, and betel-nut are given.

The arrangements made for illuminating the temple during the day, nights and festivals were perfect. Eight lamps were to be lit at dawn, eight at noon, 16 at twilight hour and eight hand lamps and two torches for the night, with calculated quantities of ghee to be provided for each of these lamps.

Another inscription details the gifts made in the form of paddy to be made to the temple for special poojas, on the days of Thiruvathirai, the natal star of Rajendran and his wife. Administrators of these endowments were appointed and their names engraved in the basement. One such name is Madathipathy Lakulisvara Pandithar, who supervised the affairs of the temple with a Vennkaatan Kovandai of Maruthur.

The temple built with so much of care and love and the arrangements made for its maintenance planned so elaborately and with forethought now stands neglected among the wild growth. The locals have now encroached on the temple area. The imposing compound wall stands dwarfed by a sugar cane plantation that eats into the foundation. 

The entrance pathway has been violated by brinjal plants. Thick foliage has covered the wall of protection, the gopuram and the inner circumbulatory passage. The dressed - stone paving in this passage has long since disappeared and this part of the temple has now become turned into a grazing field.

The gopuram is of three tiers. Made of bricks its deterioration has been quicker than the other parts of the stone temple. The central shrine faces eastward. Entwined in vines, yet in good shape, are the two guards of the mandapam belonging to the Rajendran era. A portion of the front wall of this mandapam has come down. It is only a matter of time before the rest follows. 

Perhaps the thicket holding the wall is preventing it from collapsing. The original carved granite flooring is missing. Next to the mandapam is the maha-mandapam. At its entrance are two of wonderfully carved images of the Chandrasekaran forms of Lord Siva.

In the southern section of the maha-mandapam is the shrine for the lady of the house. It is an irony that the lady, Mangala Nayaki has been made to repose among the debris. The other deities in this maha-mandapam are Surya, Murugan, and Pillaiyar suffer the same fate. Between the mahamandapam and the inner mandapam is an ante-chamber. 

Found here are two guards and a Nandhi, as specimens of Chola artistic quality and innovativeness. In the sanctum is Lord Shiva in the form of a lingam, called Panchavan Mahadevi Iswarathu Mahadevar by the founder, but today known as Ramanatha Swamy. This sanctum sanctorum is now home to a bat colony and a storeroom for wood and ladders.

On the outer walls are sculptures of Pitchadanar, Pillaiyar, Gangadhara, Dakshinamoorthy, Brahma, Durga and Lingodbhavar. All are placed in the appropriate niches. They are in perfect shape. Built in stone upto the cornice and further on in bricks, the vimanam of this temple, even after a 1,000 years, stands in flawless grace. Topping this structure is the cupola-shaped sikhara sans the stupi, a testimony to the superb engineering skills of a by-gone era.

Anyone who comes this way is sure to feel sad on seeing the dilapidated condition of the finest edifice of a splendid period of Tamilian history. It is understood that the Government on an appeal from the Rajamanickanar Centre for Historical Research, Trichy, has promised renovation. If architectural structures, statutory and wall paintings disappear, much of what might yet be learned about the epochs that produced them might disappear as well.

Udayalur, Kumbakonam, Thanjavur

Udayalur, Kumbakonam, Thanjavur
Udayalur is a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".


Historical Significance
This village is assumed to be the final resting place of the Great Chola dynasty emperor Raja Raja Chola I, though it remains less known than the temples he built far off.




Temples
There are several old temples in Udayalur dedicated to Hindu deities. The most famous is the Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple located on the northern border of the village, on the banks of river Mudikondan. Sri Paalkulathu Amman temple is situated on the banks of Palkulam – (Ksheera Theertham) on the Eastern border of the village, Sri Lakshmi Narasimha Perumal temple on the Western side and Sri Kamakshi Amman Temple on the Southern end, on the banks of river Kudamurutti. Sri Ayyanar Temple is between the Siva temple and Sri Selva Mahakali Amman temple. Kailasha Nathar temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva has significant history and due importance.


For brief details of Udayalur Temples & interesting places, please refer below;
Raja Raja Cholan's Memorial (Samadhi):
For brief details, please refer link below;
Kailasanathar Temple:
For brief details, please refer link below;
Draupathi Amman Temple:
For brief details, please refer link below;
Lakshmi Narasimhar Temple:
For brief details, please refer link below;
Paalkulathu Amman Temple:
For brief details, please refer link below;
Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple:
For brief details, please refer link below;
Festivals
The annual "Thiruvizha" or the "Thirunaal" is a celebrated during March-end or April-beginning as a token of gratitude to God. It is also a time of celebrations throughout the village and places surrounding it as people from across everywhere gather to the village. This is a common feature of most villages in the state of Tamilnadu. Street plays are held, which people attend enthusiastically.
Sri Selva Mahakali Amman & Sri Paalkulathu Amman Thiruvizha combined with Sri Ayyanar Thiruvizha is celebrated during the Tamil month of Panguni (between March – April) and the Grand Procession of Sri Selva Mahakali Amman & Sri Paalkulathu Amman will take place on the third Wednesday of the month and followed by Munnottam & Pinnottam (i.e. Running Forward & Backward Directions) on the Wednesday & Thursday. Thousands of people gather to witness this Grand Function.
Connectivity
Udayalur Village (Sri Kangeyapuram) is located 32 Kms towards East from District headquarters Thanjavur & 6 Kms from Kumbakonam. Udayalur is located at a distance of 4 Kms from Patteeswaram Durgai Amman Temple.
Take Bus No 35 from Kumbakonam to reach this place. Believed Burial place of Raja Raja Chozhan is located near Selli Amman Temple, Udayalur. Nearest Railway Station is located at Kumbakonam & Nearest Airport is located at Trichy.

Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple, Udayalur

Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple, Udayalur
Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram". Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman, also called Thillai Kali is one of the Ashta Kalis of Chola Kingdom. She is the Kaval Deivam (Protecting Deity) of Udayalur.
As per the Puranas, the consort of Sri Chidambaram, the Lord of Thillai, got angry with the Lord and came to Udayalur. She entered the village from North. On Thillai Kali’s request, the original village deity granted some space to stay. However, as Thillai Kali would not leave the place, the original deity moved to the other bank of Palkulam opposite Sri Kailasanathar temple. She thus, came to be known as Sri Paalkulathu Amman. The famous proverb "Ondavantha Pidari oor pidariyai virattiyatham" – meaning the deity seeking shelter drove away the original resident, finds its origin in this story.
Sri Sri Mahaswamihal once explained that Bhattarika became Pidari over the years much like Kathayi for Karthyayini. Thus Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman became the prime deity of the village.  Even though Sri Paalkulathu Amman and Ayyanar are worshipped, the village people worship Thillai Kali as main deity during the annual Thirunal (Thiruvizha) celebrated in Panguni (March – April). 
The Thiruvizha is a month long festival, celebrated jointly by all communities in a sincere and grand manner. People come from nearby villages, towns and even from far off places on important days. Panguni is the time when harvesting is over and people have money. Thus, the Thiruvizha is a thanksgiving festival. It begins on the first Wednesday of Panguni, with “kappu” or “pratisara bandhanam”.
A thread is tied around the right hand of Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman and also the temple Poojari. Once this is done, all those present on the kappu day necessarily return to the village for the night till the "kappu" is removed as mark of closure of festival. The strong belief is that Amman grants all prayers. During the first fortnight, Sri Ayyanar visits the village on different vahanams (vehicles), carried by youngsters. The village residents welcome him with coconut, fruits and flowers, at their door. Sri Ayyanar represents all the deities of village during these days. On the third Wednesday, Sri Ayyanar goes to Sri Paalkulathu Amman to invite her for the function and along with her goes to invite Selva Maha Kali Amman Temple present in the Siva temple.
The Utsavar of Sri Selva Maha Kali Amman is taken out of the temple only during the festival. With all the three deities in attendance, in front of Siva temple, a traditional song in praise of the Goddess takes place, which is called "Pallu Paduthal". The family entitled to do so, recollect the miracles performed by the deities. Then Selva Maha Kali Amman riding on Yali vahanam and Sri Paalkulathu Amman on horse vahanam is taken on a grand procession in a beautifully decorated chariot with Melam, Nadaswaram, band and musicians proceeding ahead of them.
All the villagers irrespective of caste and creed pull the chariot. The procession reaches the starting point almost at midnight. Among the various offerings, the most important is Kanmalar (a silver eye) and a silk pavadai. The people pulling the chariot are offered Panagam (spiced jaggery water), Neermor (butter milk), Kozhukkattai (modak), and Appam etc. Plenty of garlands adorn the deities. 
On reaching the starting point, a special Abhishekam is performed and each deity is taken on a procession on separate chariots. On reaching the place called mannadi, "Munnottam – Pinnottam", which literally means, running forward and backward takes place, to the thrill of everyone present there.  50-60 people carry each Deity.
Madurai Veeran who is a great devotee of Sri Ambal also participates. During this time 10 to 15 "Parais", a percussion instrument, are played. One has to be physically present to actually experience the inexplicable joy produced by the resonance and rhythmic sound of these parais. People who prayed for their health, offer salt and pepper on the deities. 
Silambattam, a war like game is a part of the festival. It is played using thick 7 ft. long canes. Skilled combatants fight several opponents simultaneously. Other functions like Abhishekam, Koothu (a puranic musical drama) follow on Thursday. These days music recitals also take place. The deities are then brought to Sri Laksmi Narasimhar Temple on Friday and again "Pallu Paduthal" goes on.
The performers indicate the next year’s prospects to the villagers. Ladies flock the temple from Friday through Sunday and follow the old tradition of lighting "Maavilakku Deepam". A cup is made out of rice flour and jaggery, by pounding them together, along with little ghee, and then ghee is poured in it and as usual is lighted using a wick. On Sunday, the uthsavars are moved to Sri Kailasanathar temple for regular pooja, till next festival.
People who fall ill or suffer from diseases of a particular part of the body pray to her that they will keep clay idols of the full body, or the body parts during the festival. They are cured by her. People desirous of off spring keep a horse idol. This way the potters are also benefited.

Paalkulathu Amman Temple, Udayalur

Paalkulathu Amman Temple, Udayalur
Paalkulathu Amman Temple is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".
Paalkulathu Amman Temple is located on the eastern border of the Udayalur village. There is a stone pillar bearing inscriptions at the temple doorway. Previously this pillar was part of the mandapam in Pazhayarai, where the body of Raja Raja Cholan I was laid for his last rites.
This mandapam was later demolished for unknown reasons. Eventually this pillar was planted at the Paalkulathu Amman temple.

Lakshmi Narasimhar Temple, Udayalur

Lakshmi Narasimhar Temple, Udayalur
Lakshmi Narasimhar Temple is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".
Lakshmi Narasimhar Temple is located at the Center of the Udayalur Village. As per Puranas, Sri Agasthyar stayed here and performed pooja to Sri Laksmi Narasimhar, the temple’s presiding deity. Villagers conduct regular Ekadasi Bhajans and Sri Radha Kalyanam is celebrated annually in the temple complex.

Draupathi Amman Temple, Udayalur

Draupathi Amman Temple, Udayalur
Draupathi Amman Temple is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".
Draupathi Amman temple is located on the Western side of Udayalur. Recently Kumbhabhishekam has been performed. During Aadi, Theemithi Thiruvizha is performed by those who had vowed to do so. It is believed that she answers their prayers by doing Theemithi Rituals.  
People who participate in the Theemithi Thiruvizha wear yellow robes and walk over burning coal and it is a sight to see. If they are pure and have upheld their Vratham properly they come out totally unscathed and without even the slightest burn! It is really a test by fire and one who comes out unscathed has the satisfaction that they had kept their Vratham properly.
A Thiruvizha is also conducted for the Sri Kamakshi Ambal for a week beginning on the 1st Sunday of every Chitrai month for a week. There is a Pillaiyar temple in the East end of the agraharam, and three in the vellalar streets.

Kailasanathar Temple, Udayalur

Kailasanathar Temple, Udayalur
Kailasanathar Temple is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".




The temple is almost 1000 years old and built by Rajaraja Cholan. The village also has a name Sivapadasekaramangalam obtained from the name Sivapadasekaran which is an alias of Rajarajan.




It is believed that the Samadhi of the great king is also located in the village. The village was given as a gift by the king to one of his wives by name Ulagamuzhuthudayal and the village was named Ulagamuzhuthudayalur which eventually became Udayalur.


Raja Raja Cholan's Memorial (Samadhi), Udayalur

Raja Raja Cholan's Memorial (Samadhi), Udayalur
Raja Raja Cholan’s Memorial (Samadhi) is located at Udayalur, a village in the Kumbakonam taluk of Thanjavur district, Tamil Nadu, India. Udayalur is a few kilometers away from the historic Chola dynasty stronghold town of Kizha Pazhayarai. The village was historically called "Sri Kangeyapuram".

This village is believed to be the final resting place of the Great Chola dynasty emperor Raja Raja Chola I, though it remains less known than the temples he built far off. The 1000 years old Sri Kailasanathar temple, dedicated Lord Shiva is located at Udayalur and it is believed that this temple was built by Raja Raja Cholan I.

Raja Raja Cholan – Brief History
Rajaraja Chola I (985 to 1015 CE) was an unequalled monarch who ruled the entire Southern part of India over thousand years ago, whose greatness and glory can still witnessed by the world by his magnum opus the Brihadeeswarar Temple in Thanjavur. He was born Arulmozhivarman, the second son of the Parantaka Cholan II alias Sundara Cholan and Vanavan Mahadevi. His brother the crown prince the Valiant Aditha Karikalan was assassinated and there was a political instability which followed this.

Even as a youngster when all the people of the country wanted to crown him as the ruler, he declined and relinquished his right and requested his uncle to rule the mighty Chola kingdom to avoid any ill feelings in the family and waited for fifteen years to become the monarch and ruled for thirty years from 985 to 1015 which was the beginning of the golden age of Cholas.

It’s not an exaggeration to call Rajaraja Chola an all-round genius earning him the various titles which can be found in his inscriptions. He was valiant warrior and a master strategist who built his empire by his might of his army, navy and political treaties. He paid meticulous attention to the welfare and comfort of his people. His local administration and civil administration system was par excellence. Rajaraja built the Great temple of Thanjavur and covered the two hundred feet high tower with gold to signal his contribution.

The temple survives to this day in its original grandeur. It is a magnificient haven of architecture, sculpture and paintings. His rule demonstrates the equality and liberty the chola women enjoyed. His sister Kundavai and queens possessed property in their own names, which they donated to charity, temples and infirmaries and issuing orders with equal validity as that of the Emperor. Rajaraja was a staunch follower of Saivism but ensured religious tolerance and patronized all religions Saivism, Vaishnavism, Saktam, Jainism and Buddhism alike.

Samadhi (Burial Place)
Rajaraja Chola I (985 to 1015 CE) was an unequalled monarch who ruled the entire Southern part of India over thousand years ago. After a short period of illness and suffering, the emperor of Tamil Chola Empire of India passed away on 14th January 1014. Recently the half buried slanted Shiva Lingam figured in the midst of plantain field and just behind the hut of Pakirisamy's (a farmer) in Mudikondan river bed in Udayalur, Kumbakonam taluk. The site and Shiva Lingam are being claimed as Raja Raja Cholan's ashes' burial place. Both the Shiva Lingam and the inscription lead many people to link and believe the site as the pallippadai of Raja Raja Cholan - I.

Udayalur is located 32 km from Thanjavur and 6 km from Kumbakonam. The 1000 years old Sri Kailasanathar temple, dedicated Lord Shiva is located at Udayalur and it is learned that this temple was built by Raja Raja Cholan I. It is also believed that the Chola emperor has gifted this village to Ulagamuzhuthudayal, one of his wives and also named the village as Ulagamuzhuthudayalur. This name gradually transformed as Udayalur.

Paalkulathu Amman temple is another temple located on the banks of Palkulam (Ksheera Theertham) on the eastern border of the village. There is a stone pillar bearing inscriptions at the temple doorway. Previously this pillar was part of the mandapam in Pazhayarai, where in the body of Raja Raja Cholan I laid for last rites. At a later date this mandapam was demolished for unknown reasons. Eventually this pillar was taken from the demolished site and planted at Paalkulathu Amman temple. This inscription was copied during 1880 – 1910 (about 30 years of work) reported and published in the Annual Epigraphy Report during 1927 – 28.

பால்குளத்து அம்மன் கல்வெட்டுப் பாடம்:
1 ஸ்வஸ்திஸ்ரீ ஸகலபுவந சக்கரவர்த்திகள் ஸ்ரீகு
2
லோத்துங்க சோழ தேவற்கு யாண்டு நாற்ப
3
த்திரண்டாவது ஸ்ரீசிவபாதசேகரமங்கலத்து
4
எழுந்தருளிநின்ற ஸ்ரீராஜராஜதேவரான ஸ்ரீ
5
சிவபாதசேகரதேவர் திருமாளிகை முன்பில்
6
பெரிய திருமண்டப முன்[பி¦]லடுப்பு ஜீர்
7
ந்நித்தமையில் இம்மண்டபம் எடுப்பி
8
த்தார் பிடவூர் (பிடவூர் வேளான்) வேளா
9
ன் அரிகேசவனாந கச்சிராஜற்காக இவ்வூர்
10
நாயகம் செய்து நின்ற ஜயசிங்ககுலகா
11
ல வளநாட்டு குளமங்கல நாட்டு சா
12
த்தமங்கலத்து சாத்தமங்கலமுடை
13
யான் நம்பிடாரன் நாடறிபுகழன் இ
14
வருடன் விரதங்கொண்டு செய்தார் இ
15
வ்வூர் பிடாரகளில் ராஜேந்த்ரசோழனு
16
தைய நாயகநான ஈசானசிவரும் தேவ
17
நபயமாந அறங்காட்டி பிச்சரும்
Tamil Translation:
ஸ்ரீசிவபாதசேகரமங்கலம் என்னும் ஊரில் கட்டப்பட்டிருந்த ஸ்ரீஇராஜராஜதேவரான ஸ்ரீசிவபாதசேகரதேவர் திருமாளிகையின் முன்பிருந்த பெரிய திருமண்டபம் பழுதுபட்டதால் பிடவூர் வேளான் அரிகேசவனான காசிராஜன் அதைத் திருப்பணி செய்ய விழைந்தார். ஜெயசிங்ககுலகால வளநாட்டு சாத்தமங்கலத்து பிடாரன் நாடறிபுகழன் அவருக்காக இப்பணியை மேற்கொண்டார். ஸ்ரீசிவபாதசேகரமங்கலத்துப் பிடாரர்களில் இராஜேந்திர சோழன் உதைய நாகனான ஈசானசிவரும் தேவன் அபயமான அறங்காட்டிப் பிச்சரும் இப்பணிக்கு உறுதுணையாக அமைந்தனர்.)
English Translation:
The dilapidated large hall (Thiru Mandapam) before the royal palace (Thiru Maalikai) of Sri Raja Raja Thevar (also known as) Sri Sivapathaatha Shekara Thevar at Sri Sivapaada Shekara Mangalam was rebuilt on behalf of Velaan Arikesavanatha Kasirajan of the village Pidavur executed through the head of the village Sri Sivapaada Shekara Mangalam namely Jayasingha Kulakaala valanadu, Kulamangala Naatu, Saaththa Mangalaththu (Saaththa Mangalam - his native village) along with two other Pidaarer (Tamil Saiva Temple Priests) of this village (Sivapaathasekara Mangalam) named Rajendra Chola Uthaiya Nayakanaana Esaana Sivar and Thevan Abayamaana Arangkaatti Pitchchar.
Summary:
The Inscription talks about three Pidaarers (Tamil Saiva Temple Priests), who executed the rebuilding of the dilapidated large hall (Thiru Mandapam in front of the royal palace (Sivapaathasekara Thiru Maalikai) at Sivapaathasekara Mangalam.

Some local history enthusiasts around Kumbakonam and Thanjavur re-opened discussions on this inscription. This Thiru Mandapam was interpreted as to be a Memorial Temple (of Raja Raja Cholan I) and put forward their views and took efforts to trace out the pallippadai of Raja Raja Cholan I.

Both the Shiva Lingam and the inscription lead many people to link and believe the site as the pallippadai of Raja Raja Cholan - I. Pallippadai means a Shiva temple constructed on the cemetery of a king. Pallippadai is the Tamil name for sepulchral shrine. Raising sepulchral shrine on the burial / cremation ground was found common during later Cholas period (10th and 11th century). Inscriptions would point out with details about the construction of sepulchral temples over the remains of kings and princes.

Historian Kudanthai Sethuraman (of Raman & Raman Bus Services) published a paper Aaivukk Katturaikal - vol 2 on this subject during `1980s. In this paper he has reported about his field study and about the inscription and he could not establish any link regarding pallippadai.
According to Dr. Kudavayil Balasubramanian, well known epigraphist and historian from Thanjavur district, the inscription speaks about some structures built in memory of Raja Raja Cholan I. The structure mentioned therein was renovated by Kulothunga Cholan I (1070 - 1120 A.D.). The pallippadai figured on the bed of River Mudikondan (a tributary of Cauvery) could be the part of pallippadai. The historian also related the pallippadai of Panchavan Madevi (one of the wives Raja Raja Cholan I) located at Patteeswaram (nearer to Udayalur). He also strongly believes that there could be a pallippadai of Raja Raja Cholan I located in the nearby area since the emperor spent his last days at the palace in Pazhayarai. 
The state Department of Archaeology (DoA) could not establish any such conclusion since they could not find any reliable evidence to prove it. Some people continued to claim that the Shiva Lingam site on the bed of River Mudikondan, being nearer to the erstwhile Chola capital Pazhayarai, could possibly be the sepulchral shrine since Raja Raja Chola I was buried about 1,000 years ago.  
Dr. R. Kalaikovan (Director of the Dr. M. Rajamanickanar Center for Historical Research), had visited both Paalkulathu Amman Temple and the site at Mudikondan river bed in Udayalur along with his team and conducted the field study and analyzed the inscriptions.
The article, 'Udayaloril Pallippadaya?' was posted in Varalaru.com (http://www.varalaru.com) - A Monthly Web Magazine dealing with history, culture and heritage of South India.
Web Link:
The conclusion arrived by him indicate that nothing in the inscription could be related to pallippadai.
Connectivity
Udayalur Village (Sri Kangeyapuram) is located 32 Kms towards East from District headquarters Thanjavur & 6 Kms from Kumbakonam. Take Bus No 35 from Kumbakonam to reach this place. Believed Burial place of Raja Raja Chozhan is located near Selli Amman Temple, Udayalur. Nearest Railway Station is located at Kumbakonam & Nearest Airport is located at Trichy.