Thursday, February 25, 2021

Sundareswarar Temple, Thirukattalai – The Temple

Sundareswarar Temple, Thirukattalai – The Temple

This temple is facing towards east. The temple is constructed in Ashta Parivara style where eight subsidiary shrines are placed around the sanctum. Nandi and Balipeedam can be found facing the sanctum. Provision for Dhwaja Sthambam can be seen in between Nandi and Balipeedam. The Sanctum Sanctorum consists of Sanctum, Antrala and Mukha Mandapam. Dwarapalakas can be seen guarding the sanctum. Presiding Deity is called as Sundareswarar and is facing towards east. He is housed in the sanctum in the form of Lingam.


The sanctum is square on plan. The Vimana over the sanctum is of two tiers and square in shape. Tripurantaka, Vishnu and Brahma are the niche idols in the deva koshta around the sanctum. Bikshadana, Vishnu and Brahma are Koshta idols located around the Shala of the vimana. Uma Mahesvara, Veenadhara Dakshinamoorthy, Lakshmi Varaha and Brahma are the koshta idols located around the griva of the vimana.


Mother is called as Mangala Nayagi. She is housed in a separate south facing shrine. There is a shrine for Surya in the south east corner of the temple. It houses an idol of Surya inside the shrine. He is depicted holding two lotuses in his two hands and riding his chariot drawn by seven horses. Shrine for Sapta Matrikas can be found next to the Surya Shrine on the southern side. This shrine is oblong in shape.


There is a shrine for Vinayaga in the south west corner of the temple. Subramanya shrine can be seen next to the Vinayaga shrine on the western side. There is a shrine for Jyestha in the north west corner of the temple. She is shown accompanied with Gomukha and a lady attendant. Her mount, crow can be seen on her right side. Shrine for Chandra can be seen next to the Jyestha shrine on northern side. Usually, Chandikeswarar shrine is situated in this location.


Chandikeswarar Shrine can be seen next to the Chandran shrine little towards north eastern side. There is a shrine for Bhairava in the north eastern corner of the temple. He is shown with four hands holding trisula and snake. His mount, dog, can be seen behind him. All these subsidiary shrines are attached to the outer wall of the temple. These arrangements are quite unusual in the architectural styles prescribed in the Shilpa Sastra.


Sundareswarar Temple, Thirukattalai – Inscriptions

Sundareswarar Temple, Thirukattalai – Inscriptions

There are few inscriptions found in this temple. This place is referred as Thirukatrali and Karkurichi in inscriptions. The earliest inscription is dated to the third regnal year of Aditya Chola I (871-907 CE). This inscription is found in the north wall of the sanctum. It is damaged and incomplete. It records gift of land made to this temple. There is an inscription dated to the second regnal year of Parantaka Chola I in the south wall of the sanctum. It records gift of land made to this temple. Lord Shiva of this temple was mentioned as Thirukatrali Azhwar of Karkurichi in this inscription.

Another inscription dated to the ninth regnal year of Parantaka Chola I on the south wall of the sanctum records a gift of gold coins and a lamp for maintaining perpetual lamp in this temple. Another inscription dated to the 35th regnal year of Parantaka Chola I on the south wall of the sanctum records a gift of land in Terrallur by the Ur of Karkurichi as Taruvilappuram to the temple of Perumanadigal in the same village.

There is an inscription dated to the ninth regnal year of Kulothunga Chola I in the south wall of the sanctum. It records the death of Bogendra Singa Peraraiyan of Karkurichi in the fight at Milattur. Palamandala Peraiyan of Milattur and his brother Anukkan made a gift of 25 sheep for the supply of ghee to light lamps in the temple with the wish that the feuds might stop. Another inscription dated to the tenth regnal year of Kulothunga Chola I on the south wall of the sanctum records the meikeerthi and registers a gift of land to the temple by Rajendra Chola Mangala Nadalvan of Karkurichi.

Another inscription dated to the 48th regnal year of Kulothunga Chola I on the north wall of the sanctum records a gift of land for maintaining one half of a perpetual lamp in the Mahadevar temple at Karkurichi, by a Kallan of the village, Pappan Chendan (Kulottunga Chola Mangala Nadalvan), in memory of another Kallan Amarpeti Kuppai. Another inscription dated to the second regnal year of Kulothunga Chola I on the east wall of the sanctum records that the members of Karkurichi made a gift of the padikaval rights of Kalayamangalam to the god of the local temple.

Tripurantaka Temple, Kodumbalur, Pudukottai

Tripurantaka Temple, Kodumbalur, Pudukottai

Tripurantaka Temple is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Lord Shiva, located in Kodumbalur Village in Illupur Taluk in Pudukottai District of Tamil Nadu, India. This Temple is situated to the south of Moovar Koil.

The Temple

The temple consisted of Sanctum and Ardha Mandapam of which only the plinth remains. A few sculptures of Chola workmanship, Linga and a broken Avudaiyar were found among the ruins of this temple. The noteworthy among these sculptures were a group of Tripurantaka, Tripurasundari and Tiripura demons. All these sculptures are now housed in Government Museum in Chennai. These sculptures are the finest sculptures found in the region. The temple is named as Tripurantaka Temple after these idols.

Connectivity

The Temple is located at about 10 Kms from Viralimalai, 13 Kms from Illupur, 14 Kms from Manapparai, 14 Kms from Manapparai Bus Stand, 15 Kms from Manapparai Railway Station, 38 Kms from Pudukottai, 42 Kms from Trichy Airport, 44 Kms from Trichy and 99 Kms from Madurai. The temple is situated at about 3 Kms from Trichy to Madurai highway (NH 38). Frequent Buses are available from Manapparai and Viralimalai.

Location

Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – The Temple

Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – The Temple

This Temple is facing towards east. The temple is enclosed within an ancient compound wall out of which only a few portions of the wall remains now. There is a Mandapam before the entrance of the temple. It is situated in the south-eastern corner of the temple, by the side of the compound wall. It has walls on all the four sides and a flat roof. It consists of a large pillared hall in front and a small sanctum on the back side.


The entrance to this mandapam is from the east, outside the temple complex. The entrance is flanked by two hexagonal pilasters. The base of the pilaster is carved in the shape of a lion sitting erect and carrying the pillar on its back. Nandi housed in a four pillared mandapam can be seen facing the sanctum. The Sanctum Sanctorum consists of Sanctum, Antrala, Ardha Mandapam and Mukha Mandapam.


The original temple consisted of the Sanctum, Antrala and Ardha Mandapam. The Mukha Mandapam was added to the structure in later period during Later Cholas. There is no Linga presently in the sanctum. There are niches around the walls of the sanctum however all are empty. The vimana over the sanctum is of two tiers. Dakshinamoorthy, Vishnu and Brahma are the niche idols around the top tier of the Vimana.


Veenadhara Dakshinamoorthy, Vishnu and Brahma are the niche idols around the lower tier of the Vimana. Chandikeswarar Shrine can be seen in his usual location. Mother Parvathy is housed in a separate south facing shrine. Her shrine is situated in Mukha Mandapam the left side of the sanctum. This temple might have hosted around seven subsidiary shrines compared to be sixteen subsidiary shrines of Moovar Koil, out of which remains of only four can be seen.


These shrines would have housed Ganesha, Muruga, Jyestha, Bhairava, Chandikeswara, Chandran and Sapta Matrikas. There is an ancient stone well close to the pillared mandapam of the main shrine, on the southern side. It is said to have a tunnel about 3 feet in width below, probably an inlet for water from the tank in front of the temple.


Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – Inscriptions

Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – Inscriptions

There are about eleven inscriptions in this temple. All these inscriptions are dating back from 10th Century CE to 16th century CE. Four of them belongs to the reign of Parantaka Chola I and one each of Rajaraja Chola I, Rajendra Chola I, Kulothunga Chola I, Vikrama Chola, Sundara Pandian, Vijayanagar Kings and an Araiyar Chieftain. An inscription dated to 4th regnal year of Chola king Parantaka I in 920 CE records the name of the builder, Mahimalaya Irukkuvel, chief of Kodumbalur and his liberal endowment of lands for conducting daily poojas at the temple.

This inscription also records that Mahimalaya Irukkuvel directed the priests of the Tiruppudisvaram temple to conduct worship also in the new temple of Mudukundram Udaiyar. An inscription dated to Rajaraja Chola I refers to a temple named Desi Valeeswaram at Kodumbalur. This temple is not in existence now. It is believed to have been constructed by members of merchant guild named Munnuravar. An inscription dated to Rajendra Chola I record the gifts made by a Panan of Kodumbalur Vizhuperaraiyan Vikramakesari Arulmozhi Devan.

Another inscription dated to the Vikrama Chola record the gift of 100 goats for the supply of ghee for daily poojas and lighting of two perpetual lamps by Ooralinatha Ambalakoothan Chola Vichathara Peraraiyan in memory of his son, Kunran. Another inscription dated to 1532 AD records the name of the Parvathy of this temple as Thirumudu Kundrathu Nachiyar. There are two other inscriptions found on the pillars of Mukha Mandapa of Muchukundesvara temple.

One of these inscriptions mention about Rishaba Perumanadigal of Tiruppudisvaram. This inscription is dated to the 5th regnal year of certain Chola king whose name is lost. There is another inscription on another pillar in the same Mandapam dating back to 21st regnal year of Aditya Chola 1. It mentions a gift of a lamp to the Mahadevar of Tiruppudisvaram. An inscription engraved on the pillar at the tank records a temple called Minmalai Iswaram of Kodumbalur. Minnamalai is one of the titles of Bhuti Vikrama Kesari, an Irukkuvel chief.

Minmalai Iswaram might have been built by him and later would have fallen into despair. The stones from the temple might have been used for constructing the tank. There is a Kannada inscription engraved on three stones, located in the bund of the tank in front of the Muchukundesvara temple. This inscription records a temple named Vikrama Kesarisvaram. It might have referred to the central shrine of Moovar Koil.

An inscription dated to the 17th regnal year of Vira Pandya (1270 CE) records the sale of land to Tirumudukundram Udaiyar. It also records that the land belonged to the temple of Tiruppudisvaram. Tiruppudisvaram is another long lost temple once existed in Kodumbalur. The inscriptions in this temple refers to several other temples in Kodumbalur such as Thiru Alankovil, Tiruppudisvaram and Vikramakesari Griham all of which are not in existence now.

Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – History

Muchukundesvara Temple, Kodumbalur – History

Kodumbalur was mentioned as Kodumbai lying in the trade route between Uraiyur and Madurai in the Tamil epic Silapathikaram. The route taken by Kovalan, hero of Silapathikaram, with his wife Kannagi. Kodumbalur is considered as the birthplace of Idangazhi Nayanar, one of the Irukku Velir chieftains who served under the Chola kings. The Irunkovel line of kings ruled over Ko Nadu identified with the Kodumbalur and surrounding areas in ancient Tamilakam.

Irunkovel clan is said to have been descended from the Yadavas of Dwarka, who migrated to South India with the sage Agastya. Sangam literature mentions a chieftain called Irunkovel who could trace his lineage back over 49 generations to residence in Thuvarai (Dwaraka). He is later defeated by Karikala and becomes a subordinate to the Chola sovereign. Kodumbalur was a battlefield between Pallavas and Pandyas in the 8th century CE in which both sides claimed victory.

Later, Irukkuvel became a powerful ally of the Cholas in the 9th - 10th centuries. Also, Kodumbalur became an important commercial centre from 9th century as the Manigramam, an early type of trade guild is found active here. The inscriptions in the temple also gives us a glimpse of the political climate of south India between the 8th and the 10th centuries as well as the relation between the royal houses of Chola and the Irukkuvel.

Periyapuranam provides a reference of Konnatukkodi Nagaram (apex town of Konadu) for Kodumbalur. This temple was built by Mahimalaya Irukkuvel, chief of Kodumbalur, in 920 CE during 4th regnal year of Chola king Parantaka I. The temple is mentioned as Thiru Mudukundram temple in the inscription. This temple was extensively renovated, and Maha Mandapam & Parvathy Shrine were added during 13th century CE. The temple is maintained and administered by the Archaeological Survey of India.

Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – The Temple Complex

Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – The Temple Complex

The temple complex has three major shrines. Of the three shrines, the central and the southern shrines have survived while the northern shrine has gone completely out of existence except the plinth. The three shrines stand side by side in a row, along the north-south direction, facing west. Each of the shrines had a closed Ardha Mandapam of which only the plinth remains. The Ardha Mandapam measures 18 feet by 18 feet. The Sanctum of the existing shrine measures 21 feet by 21 feet at the base. Both the Sanctum and Ardha Mandapam are square on plan.


There is a common Maha Mandapa constructed in front of these main shrines of which only the plinth remains. It measures 91 feet by 41 feet. The remains of the basement of Nandi Mandapam, Balipeedam and Dhwaja Sthambam can be seen beyond the Maha Mandapam. The plinth of the three shrines rests on a lotus base. A frieze of Vyalis with makara heads with human figures inside the mouths runs above it. The Vimana over the sanctum of these shrines are of three tiers.


Ardhanareesvara on the eastern niche, Lord Shiva in standing posture on the northern niche and empty niche on the southern side can be seen around the sanctum of the central shrine. Mother Parvathi on Lord Shiva’s lap on the eastern niche, Lord Shiva in sitting posture on the northern niche and Dakshinamoorthy on the southern niche can be seen around the second tier of the vimana of the central shrine. Indra on the eastern niche, Lord Shiva in sitting posture on the northern niche, Alinganamurti on the southern niche and Alinganamurti on the western niche can be seen around the griva of the central shrine.


Gangadhara on the eastern niche, Lord Shiva in standing posture on the northern niche and Veenadhara Dakshinamoorthy on the southern niche can be seen around the sanctum of the southern shrine. Kalarimoorthy on the eastern niche, Sanakara Narayana on the northern niche and Kalarimoorthy on the southern niche can be seen around the second tier of the vimana of the southern shrine. Andhakasura on the eastern niche, empty niche on the northern side, Alinganamurti on the southern niche and Gaja Samhara Moorthy on the western niche can be seen around the griva of the southern shrine.


The temple complex contains remains of about sixteen subsidiary shrines around the three main shrines. Each of these subsidiary shrines had a Sanctum and Ardha Mandapam. The main shrines and the subsidiary shrines were enclosed within a compound wall. This compound wall has two gates, one in the west and another near the north eastern corner. Any one of these entrance gates would have had a gopuram. The north eastern gate leads to a well, approachable by a flight of stone steps. There is a shed housing the sculptures excavated from Moovar Koil and surrounding areas outside the temple complex near the road on the northern side.


Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – Inscriptions

Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – Inscriptions

There is a Sanskrit inscription in Grantha script on the southern wall of the central shrine relating to the building of this temple. It records the genealogy of genealogy of the family of Irukkuvel chiefs of Kodumbalur and their achievements. The first line is mutilated and hence the name of the original ancestor is not known. He is said to have captured an elephant battalion evidently from some enemy. 

In his family, was born Paravirajit Viratunga; his son was Ativira, the unrivalled; his son was Sanghakrit to whom was born Nripakesari; his son was Paradurgamarddana, the glorious conqueror of Vatapi. To him was born Samarabhirama who killed Chalukki in a battle at Adhirajamangala. He married a Chola princess and Bhuti was born who by his prowess in battle obtained the title Vikrama Kesari. 

He is stated to have made the waters of the Kaveri red with the blood of the Pallava army slain by him. He also conquered Vira Pandya in battle and destroyed one Vanchi Vel. It is stated that he was living at Kodumbalur with his two wives Karrali and Varaguna, by the former of whom he had two sons Parantaka Varman and Aditya Varman. 

This Bhuti Vikrama Kesari built three shrines in the name of himself and his two consorts for Lord Mahesvara at Kodumbalur, and presented a matha to Mallikarjuna of Madura, a teacher of the Kalamukha sect of Saivas and eleven villages for feeding 50 ascetics of that sect (every day).

Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – History

Moovar Koil, Kodumbalur – History

Kodumbalur was mentioned as Kodumbai lying in the trade route between Uraiyur and Madurai in the Tamil epic Silapathikaram. The route taken by Kovalan, hero of Silapathikaram, with his wife Kannagi. Kodumbalur is considered as the birthplace of Idangazhi Nayanar, one of the Irukku Velir chieftains who served under the Chola kings. The Irunkovel line of kings ruled over Ko Nadu identified with the Kodumbalur and surrounding areas in ancient Tamilakam.

Irunkovel clan is said to have been descended from the Yadavas of Dwarka, who migrated to South India with the sage Agastya. Sangam literature mentions a chieftain called Irunkovel who could trace his lineage back over 49 generations to residence in Thuvarai (Dwaraka). He is later defeated by Karikala and becomes a subordinate to the Chola sovereign. Kodumbalur was a battlefield between Pallavas and Pandyas in the 8th century CE in which both sides claimed victory.

Later, Irukkuvel became a powerful ally of the Cholas in the 9th - 10th centuries. Also, Kodumbalur became an important commercial centre from 9th century as the Manigramam, an early type of trade guild is found active here. Bhuti Vikrama Kesari was ruling over Kodumbalur in 9th century CE. He is stated to have defeated the Pallavas and the PandyasBhuti Vikrama Kesari is identified with Tennavan Ilangovel, feudatory of the Chola king Aditya I. Daughter of BhutiNangai, was married to the Chola prince Arikulakesari, son of Parantaka I.

The temple complex was built by Kodumbalur Velir chief Bhuti Vikrama Kesari as per the Sanskrit inscription found on the southern wall of the central shrine. He named the central shrine after himself and the two flanking ones after his queens Karrali and VaragunaThe inscriptions in the temple also gives us a glimpse of the political climate of south India between the 8th and the 10th centuries as well as the relation between the royal houses of Chola and the Irukkuvel.

The Irukkuvel were traditional allies of the Cholas and the chief, Bhuti Vikrama Kesari himself was the son of a Chola princess Anupama and Irukkuvel chieftain Samarabhirama. Periyapuranam provides a reference of Konnatukkodi Nagaram (apex town of Konadu) for Kodumbalur. The temple complex is maintained and administered by the Archaeological Survey of India as a ticketed monument.

Idangazhi Nayanar Temple, Kodumbalur – Legends

Idangazhi Nayanar Temple, Kodumbalur – Legends

Idangazhi Nayanar was a Nayanar saint, venerated in the Hindu sect of Shaivism. He is generally counted as the fifty fourth in the list of 63 Nayanars. Idangazhi was born and lived in Kodumbalur, currently in Pudukottai District of Tamil Nadu, India. The life of Idangazhi is described in the Periya Puranam by Sekkizhar (12th century CE), which is a hagiography of the 63 Nayanars. Idangazhi is described as the ancestor of the Chola King Aditya I (c. 871 – c. 907 CE) in the Periya Puranam.

Idangazhi was the chieftain of the kingdom of Konadu (which was around present day Pudukkottai district), whose capital was Kodumbalur. He was a staunch devotee of the god Shiva, the patron god of Shaivism. He is said to have been descended from the Yadavas of Dwarka, who migrated to South India with the sage Agastya. He is sometimes also described to be part of the Kalabhara dynasty, flourished in the Kalabhara interregnum, a period between 3rd and the 7th century CE.

He lived and governed by Shaiva ways and made arrangements for worship of Shiva in temples as per the Shaiva Agama scriptures. There was another devotee of Shiva in Konadu. He had taken the vow of serving and feeding Shiva's devotees. However, once he became poor over time and could not get food to feed a devotee of Shiva. To complete his vow, he entered the royal granaries to steal rice, but was caught red handed and arrested by the guards. The arrested devotee was presented to Idangazhi, who understood the rationale of the intended burglary.

He pardoned the devotee and let him free. He realized the futility of a full go down when devotees of Shiva were going hungry. Idangazhi made announcements throughout the kingdom that devotees of Shiva can come and take away not only rice from the granary, but also other riches from the treasury, as much as they wanted. Idangazhi was instrumental in the spread of Shaivism and thus gained the grace of Shiva. Idangazhi Nayanar is specially worshipped in the Tamil month of Aippasi, when the moon enters the Krittika Nakshatra (lunar mansion).

Idangazhi Nayanar Temple, Kodumbalur, Pudukottai

Idangazhi Nayanar Temple, Kodumbalur, Pudukottai

Idangazhi Nayanar Temple is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Idangazhi Nayanar, one of 63 Nayanmars, located in Kodumbalur Village in Illupur Taluk in Pudukottai District of Tamil Nadu, India. The temple was built in honour of him in recent years.



Legends

For brief details, please refer below link;

https://tamilnadu-favtourism.blogspot.com/2021/02/idangazhi-nayanar-temple-kodumbalur-legends.html

The Temple

This temple is facing towards east. The Sanctum Sanctorum consists of Sanctum, Ardha Mandapam and Mukha Mandapam. Sub shrines of Vinayaga and Murugan can be seen at the entrance of the Ardha Mandapam. The Sanctum houses an idol of Idangazhi Nayanar. A colossal Nandi idol housed in a modern Mandapa can be found opposite to this temple.


Festivals

Idangazhi Nayanar is specially worshipped in the Tamil month of Aippasi, when the moon enters the Krittika Nakshatra (lunar mansion).

Connectivity

The Temple is located at about 9 Kms from Viralimalai, 13 Kms from Illupur, 13 Kms from Manapparai, 13 Kms from Manapparai Bus Stand, 14 Kms from Manapparai Railway Station, 39 Kms from Pudukottai, 41 Kms from Trichy Airport, 43 Kms from Trichy and 98 Kms from Madurai. The temple is situated at about 1.5 Kms from Trichy to Madurai highway (NH 38). Frequent Buses are available from Manapparai and Viralimalai.

Location

Aivar Koil, Kodumbalur – History

Aivar Koil, Kodumbalur – History

Kodumbalur was mentioned as Kodumbai lying in the trade route between Uraiyur and Madurai in the Tamil epic Silapathikaram. The route taken by Kovalan, hero of Silapathikaram, with his wife Kannagi. Kodumbalur is considered as the birthplace of Idangazhi Nayanar, one of the Irukku Velir chieftains who served under the Chola kings. The Irunkovel line of kings ruled over Ko Nadu identified with the Kodumbalur and surrounding areas in ancient Tamilakam.

Irunkovel clan is said to have been descended from the Yadavas of Dwarka, who migrated to South India with the sage Agastya. Sangam literature mentions a chieftain called Irunkovel who could trace his lineage back over 49 generations to residence in Thuvarai (Dwaraka). He is later defeated by Karikala and becomes a subordinate to the Chola sovereign. Kodumbalur was a battlefield between Pallavas and Pandyas in the 8th century CE in which both sides claimed victory.

Later, Irukkuvel became a powerful ally of the Cholas in the 9th - 10th centuries. Also, Kodumbalur became an important commercial centre from 9th century as the Manigramam, an early type of trade guild is found active here. Periyapuranam provides a reference of Konnatukkodi Nagaram (apex town of Konadu) for Kodumbalur. The main shrine might be assigned to 8th – 9th century CE, and the Ardha Mandapam and the Maha Mandapam might be assigned to 9th – 10th century CE. The temple is maintained and administered by the Archaeological Survey of India.

Aivar Koil, Kodumbalur – The Temple

Aivar Koil, Kodumbalur – The Temple

This temple follows the Panchayatana style of architecture. Panchayatana is an architectural style where the main shrine is built on a common plinth with four smaller subsidiary shrines at the four corners and making it a total of five shrines. Perhaps, this temple is the only one of its kind in Tamilnadu or even in South India. This temple is facing towards west. Nandi can be seen facing the Sanctum on the western side.

The Sanctum Sanctorum consisted of Sanctum, Ardha Mandapam and Maha Mandapam.  The Sanctum contains an inner sanctum enclosed by a narrow circular prakaram, against the square outer walls of which are four attendant shrines. All the five shrines have a common base or plinth, and now contain only the broken pedestals of lingams.

The lingam in the central shrine is larger than those in the sub shrines. The plinth of the Ardha Mandapam and Maha Mandapam can be seen in front of the sanctum. The plinth is lower than that of the main shrine. The Ardha Mandapam was a closed structure while the Maha Mandapam was supported by sixteen pillars and had a veranda all round.

Two flights of steps, one on the north and the other on the south, leads to the Ardha Mandapam, and two others to the circumambulatory passage of the central shrine. The subsidiary shrines at the four corners have also flights of steps to access the respective shrines. Carvings of Bhooda Ganas blowing the conch can be seen on the railings of the steps. All the shrines housed Shiva Lingas only.

Friezes of dwarfs & elephant, bulbous tops of polygonal pillars, corbels and corner pieces of the cornice, an idol of Durga with four arms, four armed Vishnu, dvarapalas and architectural fragments can be seen in the temple complex. There is an ancient circular stone well to the south of the main temple.

Inscriptions:

There are two inscriptions discovered in this temple dating back to the reign of Rajaraja Chola I. Both these inscriptions talk about the gifts made for keeping perpetual lamps burning.

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Vadaranyeswarar Temple, Mayiladuthurai – Religious Significance

Vadaranyeswarar Temple, Mayiladuthurai – Religious Significance

Pancha Dakshinamoorthy Sthalams around Mayiladuthurai:

This temple is considered as one of the Pancha Dakshinamoorthy Sthalams around Mayiladuthurai. The Pancha Dakshinamoorthy Sthalam around Mayiladuthurai are;

1.    Mayuranathaswami Temple, Mayiladuthurai

2.    Margasahayesvarar Temple, Moovalur

3.    Uchiravaneswarar Temple, Tiruvilanagar

4.    Vadaranyeswarar Temple, Mayiladuthurai

5.    Vageeswarar Temple, Peruncheri

Vallal Temples of Mayiladuthurai:

This temple is considered as one of the Vallal Temples of Mayiladuthurai. The Vallal Temples of Mayiladuthurai are

1.    Uchiravaneswarar Temple, Tiruvilanagar (Thurai Kattum Vallal)

2.    Margasahayesvarar Temple, Moovalur (Vazhi Kattum Vallal)

3.    Vadaranyeswarar Temple, Mayiladuthurai (Kai Kattum Vallal)

4.    Vageeswarar Temple, Peruncheri (Mozhi Kattum Vallal)