Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Bas Relief Panel of Elephants, Peacock and Monkey, Mamallapuram, Chengalpattu

Bas Relief Panel of Elephants, Peacock and Monkey, Mamallapuram, Chengalpattu
Bas Relief Panel of Elephants, Peacock and Monkey is situated at the back side of  Trimurti Cave Temple, located in Mamallapuram Town in Chengalpattu District of Tamil Nadu. The rear side wall of the Trimurti Cave Temple has a beautiful bas relief panel where two elephants and their cubs along with a monkey and peacock are found. The family of elephants were depicted in the lower part and the realistically-carved peacock and monkey are found a little above.



Connectivity
For brief details, please refer below link;

Bas Relief Panel of Elephants, Peacock and Monkey, Mamallapuram – Connectivity

Bas Relief Panel of Elephants, Peacock and Monkey, Mamallapuram – Connectivity
The Bas Relief is located at about 400 meters from Mamallapuram Bus Stop, 1 Km from Mamallapuram ECR Bus Stop and 1.5 Kms from Mamallapuram Shore Temple. The Bas Relief is situated at the rear side of the Trimurthy Cave Temple. Mamallapuram is located at about 15 Kms from Thirukazhukundram, 16 Kms from Thiruporur, 16 Kms from Kalpakkam, 20 Kms from Kovalam, 20 Kms from Thiruvidandai, 23 Kms from Kelambakkam, 27 Kms from Chengalpattu, 29 Kms from Chengalpattu Railway Station, 43 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur, 44 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station, 56 Kms from Chennai Central Railway Station, 56 Kms from Egmore Railway Station and 55 Kms from Chennai Airport.
By Road:
Frequent Bus Service is available from Chennai to Mamallapuram on the East Coast Road (ECR) as well as Old Mamallapuram Road (OMR). Any Bus plying towards Puducherry, Cuddalore, Nagapattinam, Chidambaram and Velankanni on ECR will stop at Mamallapuram. MTC and TNSTC (Villupuram Division) buses operate bus services between Mamallapuram and Chennai, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Thiruthani etc. MTC's bus services to Mamallapuram from various parts of the Chennai city includes some Deluxe and Air-conditioned Deluxe buses.
By Train:
Nearest Railway Stations are Chennai Central, Egmore Railway Station, Chengalpattu Railway Station and Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station.
By Air:
Nearest Airport is Chennai International Airport.

Tiger's Cave, Saluvankuppam, Mamallapuram – Connectivity

Tiger's Cave, Saluvankuppam, Mamallapuram – Connectivity
Tiger’s Cave is located at about 750 meters from Pattipulam Arasamaram Bus Stop, 6 Kms from Mamallapuram ECR Bus Stop, 6 Kms from Mamallapuram Bus Stop and 6 Kms from Mamallapuram Shore Temple. Mamallapuram is located at about 15 Kms from Thirukazhukundram, 16 Kms from Thiruporur, 16 Kms from Kalpakkam, 20 Kms from Kovalam, 20 Kms from Thiruvidandai, 23 Kms from Kelambakkam, 27 Kms from Chengalpattu, 29 Kms from Chengalpattu Railway Station, 43 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur, 44 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station, 56 Kms from Chennai Central Railway Station, 56 Kms from Egmore Railway Station and 55 Kms from Chennai Airport.
By Road:
Tiger’s Cave can be reached easily either from Chennai or Mamallapuram, as this is located on East Coast Road (ECR), the road that connects Chennai and Mamallapuram. Bus plying between Chennai and Mamallapuram stops at Pattipulam Arasamaram Bus Stop and the cave is located at walkable distance from the Bus Stop. Autos and Taxis can be hired from Chennai and Mamallapuram to reach this place.
Frequent Bus Service is available from Chennai to Mamallapuram on the East Coast Road (ECR) as well as Old Mamallapuram Road (OMR). Any Bus plying towards Puducherry, Cuddalore, Nagapattinam, Chidambaram and Velankanni on ECR will stop at Mamallapuram. MTC and TNSTC (Villupuram Division) buses operate bus services between Mamallapuram and Chennai, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Thiruthani etc. MTC's bus services to Mamallapuram from various parts of the Chennai city includes some Deluxe and Air-conditioned Deluxe buses.
By Train:
Nearest Railway Stations are Chennai Central, Egmore Railway Station, Chengalpattu Railway Station and Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station.
By Air:
Nearest Airport is Chennai International Airport.

Atiranachanda Cave Temple, Saluvankuppam, Mamallapuram – Connectivity

Atiranachanda Cave Temple, Saluvankuppam, Mamallapuram – Connectivity
The Cave Temple is located at about 750 meters from Pattipulam Arasamaram Bus Stop, 6 Kms from Mamallapuram ECR Bus Stop, 6 Kms from Mamallapuram Bus Stop and 6 Kms from Mamallapuram Shore Temple. Mamallapuram is located at about 15 Kms from Thirukazhukundram, 16 Kms from Thiruporur, 16 Kms from Kalpakkam, 20 Kms from Kovalam, 20 Kms from Thiruvidandai, 23 Kms from Kelambakkam, 27 Kms from Chengalpattu, 29 Kms from Chengalpattu Railway Station, 43 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur, 44 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station, 56 Kms from Chennai Central Railway Station, 56 Kms from Egmore Railway Station and 55 Kms from Chennai Airport.
By Road:
The Cave Temple can be reached easily either from Chennai or Mamallapuram, as this is located on East Coast Road (ECR), the road that connects Chennai and Mamallapuram. Bus plying between Chennai and Mamallapuram stops at Pattipulam Arasamaram Bus Stop and the cave is located at walkable distance from the Bus Stop. Autos and Taxis can be hired from Chennai and Mamallapuram to reach this place.
Frequent Bus Service is available from Chennai to Mamallapuram on the East Coast Road (ECR) as well as Old Mamallapuram Road (OMR). Any Bus plying towards Puducherry, Cuddalore, Nagapattinam, Chidambaram and Velankanni on ECR will stop at Mamallapuram. MTC and TNSTC (Villupuram Division) buses operate bus services between Mamallapuram and Chennai, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Thiruthani etc. MTC's bus services to Mamallapuram from various parts of the Chennai city includes some Deluxe and Air-conditioned Deluxe buses.
By Train:
Nearest Railway Stations are Chennai Central, Egmore Railway Station, Chengalpattu Railway Station and Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station.
By Air:
Nearest Airport is Chennai International Airport.

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram, Chengalpattu

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram, Chengalpattu
Adi Varaha Temple is a Hindu Temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu located in Mamallapuram Town in Chengalpattu District of Tamil Nadu. This ancient cave temple is situated at the northern end of the main Mamallapuram hill, on its western side. This temple predates the Kadal Mallai Divya Desam in Mamallapuram and is one of the two Vishnu temples that have survived ravages of the sea over a millennium. The famed Avatara inscription found in this temple, which places a floruit on the Buddha as the ninth Avatara of Vishnu, is dated to mid-7th Century.


This temple is in worship since its inception as evident from inscriptions found at the site. As the worship still continues, therefore entry of a foreign national was not allowed earlier and this is the reason that this temple was not described by the early European travellers. The fate of the temple has not changed in the modern times as well. As the temple is under worship, it is kept open only for a short period, in the morning and evening, during prayer times and for the rest of the time, it is kept closed. Due to this reason, many modern visitors and tourists skip the visit to this Temple.


Legends
For brief details, please refer below link;
History
This temple predates the Kadal Mallai Divya Desam in Mamallapuram and is one of the two Vishnu temples that have survived ravages of the sea over a millennium. Similar to the Varaha mandapa, both have been dated to the 7th Century Narasimha Varman I Era. Although it has later inscriptions belonged to Parameshwara Pallava about consecration of the temple, its style suggests that it was built earlier. The famed Avatara inscription found in this temple, which places a floruit on the Buddha as the ninth Avatara of Vishnu, is dated to mid-7th Century.


This temple is one of the best preserved and most complete specimens of the rock-cut architecture at Mamallapuram. The temple has been modified with extra structures, most probably during the sixteenth century CE when the town witnessed resurgence during the Vijayanagara period. A modern structure, in front of the temple, restrict the view to its original shrine.

The Temple
For brief details, please refer below link;
Inscriptions
For brief details, please refer below link;
Temple Opening Time
The Temple remains open from 08.00 AM to 12.00 Noon and 03.00 PM to 05.00 PM.
Festivals
On the full moon day in Maasi every year, the utsava deity, Gnanapiran, goes on a procession to the sea shore on a Garuda Vahana.  
Contact
Adi Varaha Temple,
Mamallapuram – 603 104
Chengalpattu District
Mobile: +91 98404 08755
Connectivity
For brief details, please refer below link;

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Connectivity

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Connectivity
The Temple is located at about 650 meters from Mamallapuram Bus Stop, 2 Kms from Mamallapuram ECR Bus Stop and 1 Km from Mamallapuram Shore Temple. Mamallapuram is located at about 15 Kms from Thirukazhukundram, 16 Kms from Thiruporur, 16 Kms from Kalpakkam, 20 Kms from Kovalam, 20 Kms from Thiruvidandai, 23 Kms from Kelambakkam, 27 Kms from Chengalpattu, 29 Kms from Chengalpattu Railway Station, 43 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur, 44 Kms from Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station, 56 Kms from Chennai Central Railway Station, 56 Kms from Egmore Railway Station and 55 Kms from Chennai Airport.
By Road:
Frequent Bus Service is available from Chennai to Mamallapuram on the East Coast Road (ECR) as well as Old Mamallapuram Road (OMR). Any Bus plying towards Puducherry, Cuddalore, Nagapattinam, Chidambaram and Velankanni on ECR will stop at Mamallapuram. MTC and TNSTC (Villupuram Division) buses operate bus services between Mamallapuram and Chennai, Chengalpattu, Kancheepuram, Thiruthani etc. MTC's bus services to Mamallapuram from various parts of the Chennai city includes some Deluxe and Air-conditioned Deluxe buses.
By Train:
Nearest Railway Stations are Chennai Central, Egmore Railway Station, Chengalpattu Railway Station and Thiruvanmiyur Railway Station.
By Air:
Nearest Airport is Chennai International Airport.

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Legends

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Legends
A Pallava King made a daily trip to the Varaha Perumal temple at Thiru Vidanthai. He would have his morning food only after this darshan. Also, it was his practice to feed a 1000 people each day after coming back from Thiru Vidanthai. Lord Vishnu decided to put his devotion to test. One morning he appeared before the king as a hungry Brahmin carrying along with a child (Goddess in disguise).
The king requested if he could first make his daily trip to Thiru Vidanthai and then offer them food as that was his practice. The Lord in disguise rejected this suggestion stating that he was dying of hunger and that it may be too late for the child by the time the king returned. Invoking the blessings of Varaha Perumal of Thiru Vidanthai, the king decided that feeding a hungry child was more important than his trip.
Pleased with the king’s true devotion, the disguised Lord provided darshan to the king at the same place as Varaha Perumal with Agilavalli Thayar on his right side (at Thiru Vidanthai, Goddess is seen to the left of the Lord). Pallava King Simha Vishnu is believed to have built this cave temple. In memory of his contribution, one finds stone idols of Simha Vishnu along with his son Mahendra Varma Pallava.

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Inscriptions

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – Inscriptions
The Temple has inscriptions in Tamil, Sanskrit and Telugu. All these inscriptions belong to Pallava and Chola Kings. There are the portraits sculptures of the Pallava kings and also bear inscriptions however the identity of these kings has not yet reached consensus among the scholar community. A King seated in sukhasana posture on a seat with two of his queens standing beside him can be seen in one of the panels. The inscription above this panel reads, “the glorious Athiraja Simhavinna-Potrra (Simhavishnu-Pota)”. This Pallava king has been identified with the Pallava king Simhavishnu.
There is another panel displaying another Pallava king opposite to the above panel. The inscription above the panel reads “the glorious Athiraja Mahendra-Pottra”. This king has been identified with the Pallava king Mahendravarman I. These label inscriptions were engraved above the two portraits panels more than century after the creation of the temple. There are two other important sculptures found in this cave shrine. As per the inscriptions, the kings are identified as Simhavishnu and Mahendravarman.
There is an inscription on a slab built into the floor in front of the temple, near Balipeedam. This Inscription belongs to the Pallava king Nandivarman II and dated to sixty-fifth regnal year, corresponding 796 CE. It mentions about the purchase of land by Idaivalanchan Kandan, son of Ilam-Paduvumar, the headman of Kunrathur in Amur Nadu, a merchant of Mamallapuram, in lieu of gold. Boundaries of the land are specified. Among the boundary are two tanks, Koneri and Mandai Thalaivan Eri.
There is an inscription on a niche in the temple. It belongs to Chola Emperor Rajendra Chola I.  It is dated to ninth regnal year, corresponding to 1061 CE. The Chola king is referred as Parakesarivarman alias Udaiyar Sri Rajendra Deva. It records a tax-free gift of land by the nagarams and perilamai of Mamallapuram alias Jananathapuram to Lord Sri Parameshwara Maha Varaha Vishnugriha. Mamallapuram was a Nagaram in Amur-Nadu in Amurkkottam, a sub division of Jayangondachola Mandalam.
There is another inscription on a niche in the temple. It belongs to Chola Emperor Rajendra Chola I.  It is dated approximately to 1052 CE. It mentions about a tax-free land donation to the temple of Parameshwara Maha Varaha Vishnugrihattalvar at Mamallapuram by the village of Tiruvelichchil.
There is an inscription on the lintel above the Hariharan panel. It lists ten incarnations of Vishnu, as Matsya, Kurma, Varaha, Narasimha, Vamana, Rama, Rama, Rama, Buddha and Kalkin. The three Ramas of the inscriptions should be taken as Parashurama, Lord Rama, the son of Dasharatha and Balarama. There is strange verse engraved on the floor of the cave hall. This verse speaks about a curse to those who do not follow Rudra or Shiva. It is very strange to find such a verse in a temple dedicated to Vishnu.

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – The Temple

Adi Varaha Temple, Mamallapuram – The Temple
This temple is one of the best preserved and most complete specimens of the rock cut architecture at Mamallapuram. The temple has been modified with extra structures, most probably during the sixteenth century CE when the town witnessed resurgence during the Vijayanagara period. A modern structure, in front of the temple, restrict the view to its original shrine. The original edifice is a west facing cave temple, measuring 30 feet x 14 feet x 11.5 feet. The cave is excavated into a hall consisting of two bays. This is supported on four pillars and two pilasters. The pillars are of lion-base variety with octagonal shafts.


The sanctum is adorned with a mandapa in front, flanked with dvarapalas on either side. One of the dvarapala has shankha and one has chakra carved on his head, which suggests that the shrine was dedicated to Vishnu. The shrine cut in the centre at the back wall of cave is dedicated to Lord Varaha, the boar incarnation of Lord Vishnu. The original idol is completely plastered, painted and covered with stucco.


Varaha is shown with four arms and carrying Bhu Devi (the mother Earth). He is facing west and in standing posture. Presiding Deity is sculpted on the rock with his left leg placed on a Naga King and Queen and with his left hand on Thayar’s lap. Mother is called as Agilavalli Thayar and Utsavar is Gnana Piran. There are also stone idols of Rudra, Brahma, Goddess Lakshmi and Durga inside this cave temple.


Gangadhara:
Shiva is represented as Gangadhara in one of the panels. Gangadhara seems to be a famous and frequented icon during the Pallava period. He is shown with four hands, in one of his hand, he is holding his tresses to accommodate Ganga. Ganga, in her female form, is shown in one corner, descending towards the held tresses. There are no attendants, devotees, mounts or other figures in this panel such as the god and the lady are left alone to carry out their business.
Brahma:
There is a Panel for Brahma opposite to Gangadhara Panel. He is shown with four hands, carrying rosary in one hand, placed one hand on his waist and one hand in abhaya-mudra. He is standing alone, with no companion or devotes.
Gaja Lakshmi:
The north side wall also has another panel of Gajalakshmi. The panel of Gaja Lakshmi is similar to that in the other Varaha Cave. Lakshmi is found seated on a lotus flower and holds flower in her arms. She is accompanied with four attendants. Two attendants on either side of her carrying flowers and the other two attendants were with vessels carrying water. One elephant is pouring water on the Goddess whereas another elephant is trying to pick the vessel from one attendant.
Vishnu:
There is a panel for Lord Vishnu in the south side of the wall to the left of the sanctum. Lord Vishnu is with four arms. Two devotees are shown kneeling near his feet. It is notable as Lord Vishnu is generally found lying on the serpent. Here, Adi Sesha is found in a separate panel standing next to Vishnu.
Adi Sesha:
There is a panel for Adi Sesha next to Lord Vishnu in the south side of the wall to the left of the sanctum. The idol of Adi Sesha, the divine serpent is found in the human form. He is shown with seven hooded in the panel.
Hari Haran:
There is a panel for Hari Haran (a form of Shiva and Vishnu) on the right side of the entrance of the sanctum. He is shown with four hands carrying Parasu (axe) and chakra (discus). He is shown standing below an umbrella or parasol. Two devotees, one on either side, are shown near his feet.
Mahishamardini:
There is a majestic panel depicting Mahishamardini opposite to Gaja Lakshmi Panel. She is shown with eight hands, carrying shankha (conch), chakra (discus), bow, sword, shield and a bell. A parrot is perched on her lower left arm wrist and it seems to be looking at what she is holding in her lower right hand. She holds a blood-bowl as held by Chamunda or Kali. She stands in a tribhanga posture above a severed buffalo head. The buffalo would be representing the demon Mahishasura.
Behind Durga is a standard top of which is in form of a trishula (trident). A lion and a deer, both are mounts of Durga, are shown in the upper corners. Near these animals are ganas, one on either side of Durga. She is accompanied with two female guardians, one bearing a bow and one sword and shield. There are two devotees near her feet. One of the devotees is in the process of cutting flesh from his arm.
Portrait Sculptures:
There are the portraits sculptures of the Pallava kings and also bear inscriptions however the identity of these kings has not yet reached consensus among the scholar community. A King seated in sukhasana posture on a seat with two of his queens standing beside him can be seen in one of the panels. One of his hand shows Chin Mudra. He is shown with minimal jewellery. The inscription above this panel reads, “the glorious Athiraja Simhavinna-Potrra (Simhavishnu-Pota)”. This Pallava king has been identified with the Pallava king Simhavishnu.
There is another panel displaying another Pallava king opposite to the above panel. The king is shown standing with his two queens, and he has raised one hand pointing towards the Durga panel. He is holding hand of one of his queens, who might be the senior or chief queen. The inscription above the panel reads “the glorious Athiraja Mahendra-Pottra”. This king has been identified with the Pallava king Mahendravarman I. These label inscriptions were engraved above the two portraits panels more than century after the creation of the temple.
There are two other important sculptures found in this cave shrine. A king with two of his queens following him can be found in one of the sculptures. All are found in the standing posture. Another sculpture has the king in the sitting posture whereas his queens are standing on his either sides. As per the inscriptions, the kings are identified as Simhavishnu and Mahendravarman.

Secret Tunnel:
An interesting feature at the temple is the entrance to a secret 15 Kms long tunnel (now shut) that was once an underground route to the Nithya Kalyana Perumal temple in Thiru Vidanthai. One also finds such a secret passage at Parameswara Vinnagaram (Vaikunda Perumal) Divya Desam in Kanchipuram which once led to Mamallapuram almost 70 Kms east.

Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Connectivity

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Connectivity
The Temple is located at about 1 Km from Srivilliputhur Bus Stand, 2 Kms from Srivilliputhur Railway Station, 12 Kms from Rajapalayam, 21 Kms from Sivakasi, 38 Kms from Sattur, 45 Kms from Sankarankovil, 46 Kms from Virudhunagar, 60 Kms from Kovilpatti, 76 Kms from Madurai Airport and 80 Kms from Madurai.
By Road:
The main bus stand is located in the heart of the town. There are regular inter-city bus services to the town. The Tamil Nadu State Transport Corporation operates daily services connecting various cities to Srivilliputhur. The State Express Transport Corporation operates long distance buses connecting the town to important cities like Chennai and Madurai. The national highway NH 208 that connects Madurai and Kollam passes through the town and connects surrounding urban centres like Rajapalayam and Tenkasi.
By Train:
Srivilliputhur Railway Station is located in the rail head from Madurai to Tenkasi and Sengottai. It connects Tamil Nadu with Kerala through Rajapalayam and Sengottai. The Podhigai Express connects Srivilliputhur to Sengottai and Chennai Egmore in either directions. All other express trains ply from Virudunagar Station. There are also passenger trains running either side from Madurai to Tenkasi.
By Air:
The nearest local and international airport is Madurai International Airport, located 76 Kms away from the town.

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Literary Mention

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Literary Mention
Mangalasasanam:
Periyalwar had sung 1 Paasuram and Andal had sung 1 Paasuram about Lord Vishnu of this Temple in Nalayira Divya Prabandhams.
Periyalwar Paasurams:
Periyalwar sang the 12 Paasurams of Thiru Pallaandu and 461 Paasurams of Periyalwar Thirumozhi.
Nachiyar Thirumozhi:
Andal sang 143 Paasurams of Nachiyar Thirumozhi. Andal  in her Nachiyar Thirumozhi has sung an important Paasuram on Tiru Maliruncholai Perumal starting as “Naaru Narum Pozhil Maaliruncholai Nambikki Naan Nooru Thada Vennai Vaay Nerndhu Paravi yaithen; Nooru Thada Niraindha Akkara Adisil Sonnen; Eru Thiru Udayan Indru Vandhu Ivai Kolungalo”. This wish of hers was later fulfilled by Acharya Ramanuja. Hence, she is said to have invited Ramanuja, when he came to Srirangam temple as “Kovil Annan Vaareer”! And in her Vaazhi Tirunamam we say thus , “ Perum Poodoor Mamunikki Pin Aanal Vazhiye”!
Thiruppavai:
Andal sang the 30 Paasurams of Thiruppavai. Andal’s Thiruppavai (30 verses in praise of Lord) is one of the most beautifully composed songs among the Nalayira Divya Prabandham. It is believed that singing these 30 verses will bring peace and prosperity as well as God’s grace. It was in the month of Margazhi (December to January) that Andal composed Thiruppavai at the tender age of five.
Thiruppavai celebrates, in 30 songs, a certain simple ritualistic observance on the part of the devotees. While it appears in the early stanzas that Aandal’s intention is to pursue the Lord to marry her, as one reads through the later verses, one finds that she is actually praying to be allowed the service of the lord. The first ten songs celebrate the fruits of the devotional observance, the second ten songs seem to wake up Lord Krishna to pray for their grace and the last ten songs inspire devotees to take the path of service to Lord.
During Margazhi, the Vishnu temples open very early, around 4.00 am, and the entire 30 songs of Thiruppavai are chanted in a special rendition. It has been an age-old belief that unmarried girls who bathe in a pond and visit temples to recite the Thiruppavai with sincere devotion will attain spiritual husbands.
It is said that one song of the 30 Thiruppavai verses is dedicated for each of the thirty days of Margazhi. A unique feature in centuries gone by was that letters written during Margazhi used to start with one Thiruppavai Paasuram (relevant to the day) that would serve as an indication of the date of the letter (The date itself was not written in the letter).
Thiruppavai and Thiruvembavai - Vaishnavism and Saivism acknowledging each other:
An interesting facet of Thiruppavai and Thiruvembavai is that the first verse in Thiruppavai begins with the Maa (Margazhi Thingal), the syllable with which Manikkavacakar’s name begins and the first verse in Thiruvembavai too begins with the syllable Aa (Aadhiyum), with which Aandal's name begins, an indication of the mutual respect the two great saint poets had for each other - a tale of Vaishnavism and Saivism acknowledging each other.
Villibaratham:
Villiputhoorar who wrote the Villibaratham in Tamil based on the Mahabharata of Sage Vyasa was also born here.

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Religious Significance

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Religious Significance
References in Puranam:
Srivilliputhur finds mention in Brahma Kaivatsa Puranam and Varaha Puranam. Varaha Puranam foretells the existence of Srivilliputhur and the consequent visit of Vishnu during the Varaha Avataram. Brahma Kaivatsa Puranam mentions the location of Vatapatrasayi Temple in Srivilliputhur.
Birthplace of Andal & Periazhwar:
The Srivilliputhur Divya Desam has the unique distinction among all other Divya Desams of being the birthplace of two important Azhwars among the twelve Azhwars, Periazhwar, who became the father-in-law of the Ranganatha himself and Andal who was the incarnation of Bhooma Devi and attained union with the Ranganathan at Srirangam. Andal is the only female Azhwar saint of the 12 Alvar saints of South India.
She is credited with the Tamil works of Thiruppavai and Nachiyar Thirumozhi that are still recited by devotees during the Winter festival season of Margazhi. The town wakes up to the sounds of Thiruppavai is believed to lead to a sublime atmosphere throughout the day. In many places in India, particularly in Tamil Nadu, Andal is treated more than a saint and as a form of god herself and a shrine for Andal is dedicated in most Vishnu temples.
Practice of sending garland worn by Andal to Tirumala Venkateshwara and Alagar Koil Kallazhagar:
It is interesting to know that a garland worn by Andal is sent to Tirupathy one day before the Brahmotsavam begins in Thirumalai and offered to Lord Venkateswara. Kallazhagar of Madurai is also presented with a garland worn by Andal on Chithirai Festival day.
Araiyar Sevai:
As in Srirangam and Alwar Tiru Nagari, Araiyar Sevai where the Alwar Paasurams are recited with expression, music and rhythm is performed here.
Birthplace of Villiputtoor Alwar:
Srivilliputhur is the birthplace of Villiputtoor Alwar, who translated Vyasa Bharatham in Tamil.

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Religious Practices & Festivals

Srivilliputhur Andal Temple – Religious Practices & Festivals
Religious Practices:
The temple priests perform the Pooja (rituals) during festivals and on a daily basis. Like other Vishnu temples of Tamil Nadu, the priests belong to the Vaishnavite community, a Brahmin sub-caste. Each ritual has three steps: alangaram (decoration), naivethanam (food offering) and deepa aradanai (waving of lamps) for both Vatapatrasayi and Andal. During the last step of worship, Nadaswaram (pipe instrument) and tavil (percussion instrument) are played, religious instructions in the Vedas (sacred text) are recited by priests and worshippers prostrate themselves in front of the temple mast. There are weekly, monthly and fortnightly rituals performed in the temple.
Festivals:
Annual festivals are celebrated in the months of Aadi and Margazhi and Purattasi.
Aadi Pooram:
Thousands of people from the state participate in the Aadi Pooram festival celebrated in the Andal Temple. After early morning special pujas, the presiding deities, Ranga Mannar and Goddess Andal are taken in decorated palanquins to the car. The festival marks the adoption of presiding deity, Andal, by Periyazhwar after he found her near a Tulsi plant in the garden of Vatapatrasayi Temple at Srivilliputhur on the eighth day of the Tamil month of Adi.
During the Chitra festival in Madurai, Kallazhagar (of Azhagar Koil) makes an important stop at Thalakulam Perumal Koil to collect the garland sent by Aandal of Srivilliputhur. Only after wearing the garland, does Azhagar get into the Vaigai River. During the Aadi Thiruvadi Pooram festival, marking the birthday of Aandal, Lord Azhagar of Thiru Maalirun Cholai sends his attire to Srivilliputhur as a return gesture to her.
5 Garuda Sevas:
On the birth day of Aandal in the Tamil Calendar month of Aadi, one witnesses 5 Garuda Sevas - Venkatachalapathi, Thiruthangal Appan, Vadabadrasayee, Ranga Mannar and Kaatu Azhagar Sundararajan.
Araiyar Sevai:
A big attraction at the Srivilliputhur temple is the Araiyar Sevai, the visual song and dance enactment of the Paasurams (4000 Divya Prabandham verses) that has been performed at Divya Desams for over 1000 years. Srivilliputhur remains one of the three Divya Desams in Tamil Nadu where Araiyar Sevai is still being performed, the other two being Srirangam and Azhwar Thiru Nagari (near Tirunelveli). The famed Araiyar Sevai is said to have originated from Thirukkurungudi, the Divya Desam about 40 Kms from Tirunelveli.
Legend has it that the Lord used to listen to Araiyar’s Abhinayam hiding behind a wall in Bashyam Street (South Mada Street). Araiyars (King of Music) are descendants of Nathamuni, who is believed to have introduced the Araiyar Sevai. It is believed that Lord Ranganatha himself gave the Araiyars the right to perform the unique musical chanting at the temples and presented them with the cone-like red cap, two cymbals and the sacred garland (which they wear around their neck when they perform).
The Araiyars first recite the Paasuram, then explain its inner meaning and finally perform the Abhinayam, a unique art/dance performance with their hands and legs explaining the Paasurams with special musical effect. This special explanation (Vyakyaanam) requires a deep knowledge and understanding of the Paasurams and its inner meaning. It is not an easy art, as can be seen from the fact that it takes one nearly 20 years to learn and perfect the Abhinayam.
One of the Araiyar Sevai occasions that is of particular significance is during Vaikunda Ekadasi - The Paghal Pathu (10 days) and the Era Pathu (10 Nights) – when one is treated to a real spectacle with the Araiyars enacting the Story of Andal growing into a young beautiful girl through their Abhinayam.
Panguni Uthiram:
Sri Andal's Kalyana Utsavam is celebrated during Panguni Uthiram, one of the specialised Utsavam of this temple.