Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Jambukeswarar Temple, Thiruvanaikaval – Literary Mention

Jambukeswarar Temple, Thiruvanaikaval – Literary Mention
Appar:
The Saivite saint 'Thirunavukarasar' who is also popularly known as 'Appar' sung 'Thiruvanaikaa Thirukkurunthogai' to praise the Lord and Devi of Thiruvanaikoil. 
Kalamega Pulavar:
He was one of the greatest Tamil poets, also called as “Kavi Kalamegam”. He then sung 'Tiruvaanaikka Ula' praising Devi Akhilandeshwari.
Kalamega Pulavar sung the 'Saraswathi Maalai' on Akhilandeshwari, envisaged her as Goddess Saraswathi (Goddess of Wisdom).
Sundarar:
Sundarar sung songs mentioning the Lord at Thiruvanaikoil is the form of the four 'Vedhas'.
Thiru Gnanasambandar (Sambandar):
The child prodigy and one of the famous 'Nayanmar' Thiruganasambhandar sung many songs ('Pathigam') praising the Lord and Devi of Thiruvanaikoil.
Arunagirinathar:
Arunagirinathar sung many songs in his master piece 'Thirupugazh' (Thirupugazh was sung in praise of Lord Muruga).
This song tells the story of the construction of 'Thiruneetran Madhil' i.e. the 'Viboothi Praharam'.
Meenakshisundaram Pillai:
'Mahavithuvan' Thirusirapuram (Olden day’s name of Trichy) Meenakshi Sundaram Pillai has written 'Thiruvaanaikaa Akilandanayaki Maalai', praising Devi Akhilandeshwari and Lord Jambulingam of Thiruvanaikoil.
Kachchiyappa Munivar:
Kachchiyappa Munivar lived in late 18th Century. He was also known as 'Kavi Ratchasan'. He was one of the 'Adhinams' (Saint) of Tiruvavaduthurai Mutt. Kachchiyappa Munivar is the one to come up with the history of the Thiruvanaikoil temple through his master piece 'Thiruvanaikaa Puranam'.
Muthuswamy Dikshithar:
This shrine has been immortalized by one of the Trinity of Carnatic music Muthuswami Dikshitar, with two unusual compositions in Sanskrit, one titled ‘Jambupate’ in 'Yamunakalyani' 'Raga' and the other ‘Akilandeswari’ in 'Dvijavanti' raga. Both compositions are in ragas that are not indigenous to the south but borrowed from the music of the north (resembling Hindustani music).
The Dikshitar song, however, is a masterpiece of classical Carnatic traditions, layered, slow and restrained, and yet magnificent and joyous; an outpouring to Shiva in his manifestation as water, "Ambudhi Ganga Cauvery Yamuna kambu-kantya Akhilandeswari Ramana", Lord of the oceans, and of the Ganga, Cauvery and Yamuna, and of Akhilandeswari, She of the throat as smooth as a conch.

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